Wharfedale overnight – the next morning

I just found this post in my Drafts folder in WordPress and realised it had been there since early summer and never posted. I think I held it back because the trip hadn’t fully worked out and I didn’t get many shots from the morning sunrise. Looking at it now though, there aren’t many shots here but they’re nice ones so here’s the post, to remind me of summer wild camping trips.
Wharfedale

After a good night’s sleep in warm, calm weather I eventually awoke to my alarm from a deep sleep at 4:15 am. The sky looked very promising and there was an almost-full moon on the other side of the valley. I got up and got ready and hid my camping stuff out of sight so they wouldn’t be seen in any shots I took.

I got increasingly excited as the clouds started to catch with orange light. However it was clear that the sun was going to come up right behind the highest part of the hill beside me – something I could have found out easily if I’d checked my compass. More to the point there were enough clouds in the way that the initial promise soon fizzled out. Just like my Eskdale trip of a few days before the sunrise was to disappoint and leave me with unfinished business. So – not many shots in this post but hopefully I’ll be back.

Holme Fell part three

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I’m still catching up processing the shots of Holme Fell I’ve been taking over the last few weeks. The autumn colour is now largely gone and we’re getting into winter scenery but in these shots there is still plenty of orange and gold.

On this trip I started at the quarry. There is a lookout on the edge of all things with a great view of the Langdale Pikes, those hills of unmistakable shape. Then I explored upwards, going out onto the open fell for more spectacular views. This was when I realised the panorama that was available, taking in the Pikes, Fairfield and Helvellyn, Coniston Water, and in the distance the Howgill Fells.

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I still have more shots to come from this place and I’m sure I’ll be back as the season changes, especially if snow comes. For now I hope you enjoy this latest batch.

Holme Fell part one

Lingmoor Fell and Bowfell
Lingmoor Fell and Bowfell

I’ve been all around this area of the Lake District for many years and thought I knew it well but there is a square mile in the middle that I’ve overlooked and turns out to contain treasure.

The only other time I visited Holme Fell was in summer some years ago and it was a wilderness of ankle-breaking rocks and chest high bracken. The weather and light weren’t encouraging that day and I never went back. I’ve seen a number of shots from other photographers that suggested it was worth another go. It is without doubt a landscape photographer’s paradise.

Fairfield from Holme Fell
Fairfield from Holme Fell

In the past I’ve usually flitted around from one location to another – Yorkshire Dales one week, Wales the next, and so on. For the past several weeks I’ve been changing tactics and visiting the same place repeatedly to try and get the best from it. I think so far I’ve only made a small dent.

There are great panoramic views of the southern lakeland fells – Fairfield and Helvellyn, the Langdale Pikes, Bowfell, Wetherlam and Coniston. There’s a great view of the head of Coniston Water. On a clear day you can easily see Ingleborough over in the Yorkshire Dales.

Then there are the slate mining remnants and the quarry (I should say – The Quarry – it’s certainly impressive enough to be capitalised). In autumn it’s a wonderful golden mix of broadleaf and larch with plenty of shapely silver birch which will carry on being photogenic when bare in winter.

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I’ve now had four trips, each of which has produced some good shots – five if you count the Tarn Hows trip I reported a couple of posts ago, Tarn Hows being right next door if you will. I still don’t think I’ve got the best out of it. I also think from now on I might repeat this tactic of concentrating on small areas for prolonged periods.

Autumn is here – Tarn Hows

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Tarn Hows is one of the most beautiful lakes in an area renowned for beautiful lakes – the Lake District. In the Lake District there are Lakes (e.g. Bassenthwaite Lake), Waters (e.g. Coniston Water) and Tarns (e.g. Angle Tarn, Sprinkling Tarn). Tarn Hows is, presumably then, a tarn – don’t ask me the difference.

From the small knoll at its side you can see Wetherlam, the Langdale Pikes and the Fairfield/Helvellyn range. It is also surrounded by very colourful trees, making it a must-visit destination in autumn. It was no surprise then that I saw so many other serious-looking photographers, though at no point did the place feel crowded.

One of the joys of Tarn Hows in autumn is the growth of larch trees that turn bright orange in autumn but unfortunately they’re being badly affected by a fungal growth and the landowner (the National Trust) is clearing out large areas of larch to try and control the spread.

It’s a very easy location to photograph as there is a car park right next to the lake so once the sun has set you’re back in the car within a few minutes. Despite several visits over the years I still don’t feel I’ve been able to do it justice so I think many more visits will be called for.

Sunset at The Roaches

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Wow, it’s been about six weeks since I last posted. Holidays, laziness, and generally not actually getting any good pictures for a while in the rainy summer we’ve had this year.

I finally got some nice shots on a trip to The Roaches. This is presumably a corruption of the french word “rocher” and it’s a large area of exposed gritstone crags, famous among english rock climbers and very popular for walkers and picnickers. It’s also pretty popular with photographers and I’ve usually seen others around with big cameras and tripods when the weather is promising.

The only downside is that the distance is pretty much flat. It would be nice to have some hills on the horizon to add interest but I suppose you have to work with what you’ve got. In fact isn’t that the whole point of landscape photography? If I can’t get good shots at The Roaches then perhaps I should hang up my camera.

I hope you enjoy these shots. Now we’re getting into autumn I’m hoping I’ll be getting plenty more.

Askrigg and Bainbridge – around Wensleydale

Wensleydale
Wensleydale

Another trip around Wensleydale, this time through the meadows and fields at the bottom of the valley around the villages of Bainbridge and Askrigg.

Again the fields were full of flowers and everywhere you see the pattern of drystone walls and barns that the Dales are famous for.

Right now I’m really concentrating on the Dales and I’m hoping I’ll get the chance for more overnight wild camps before the summer ends. Doesn’t look very likely with all the rain we’ve had so far.