Sunset at The Roaches

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Wow, it’s been about six weeks since I last posted. Holidays, laziness, and generally not actually getting any good pictures for a while in the rainy summer we’ve had this year.

I finally got some nice shots on a trip to The Roaches. This is presumably a corruption of the french word “rocher” and it’s a large area of exposed gritstone crags, famous among english rock climbers and very popular for walkers and picnickers. It’s also pretty popular with photographers and I’ve usually seen others around with big cameras and tripods when the weather is promising.

The only downside is that the distance is pretty much flat. It would be nice to have some hills on the horizon to add interest but I suppose you have to work with what you’ve got. In fact isn’t that the whole point of landscape photography? If I can’t get good shots at The Roaches then perhaps I should hang up my camera.

I hope you enjoy these shots. Now we’re getting into autumn I’m hoping I’ll be getting plenty more.

From Bytes to Terabytes

Every thursday I go to the Museum of Science and Technology in Manchester to volunteer as a demonstator on the SSEM replica, also known as the “Manchester Baby” – the world’s first stored program computer. In 1948 this machine has only 128 bytes of non-permanent storage. Soon after they added a hard drive that had about 10 kilobytes of storage, a useful amount in 1948. Continue reading

Askrigg and Bainbridge – around Wensleydale

Wensleydale
Wensleydale

Another trip around Wensleydale, this time through the meadows and fields at the bottom of the valley around the villages of Bainbridge and Askrigg.

Again the fields were full of flowers and everywhere you see the pattern of drystone walls and barns that the Dales are famous for.

Right now I’m really concentrating on the Dales and I’m hoping I’ll get the chance for more overnight wild camps before the summer ends. Doesn’t look very likely with all the rain we’ve had so far.

Lee ND Grad Filters colour accuracy

OnLandscape magazine has had a series on neutral density graduated filters, with one part on colour accuracy. Tim Parkin, editor and author, happens to mention that his very old Lee resin filters had changed colour over the years and now had a strong colour cast. I had suspected this myself with my own set of Lee resin filters. A quick test confirms this. Here are some shots I took, the captions tell the story. Continue reading